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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
right now in the united states. what we have, in fact, is a system and senate discuss, it's startling when i heard this. the nation has a demand nearly for 120,000 computer science engineers, but our universities only produce 40,000 people. this is an indictment of our educational system. we need to fix that. we need to get to a point in this country where we have 120,000 people graduating to meet the demand. but in the short term right now we have to deal with the fact that of those 80,000 jobs, those 80,000 graduates are not created here, those jobs are still going to exist. they're just not going to exist here. these companies are not going to wait for us to produce more graduates. these companies are not going to wait for us to fix our immigration system. they have a business to run and if they can't find the people they need to fill these jobs, they will just send those jobs to another country. let me to you what that means in practical terms. the high-paying jobs in these industries will be paying the taxes to some other country, will be simply an economy and some of the country
, john kerry bid good-bye to the united states senate today in an emotional lookback on his career. he talked about the importance of listening, not just to his fellow senators, but to the people they represent. . >> i came to the national mall, 1971 with fellow veterans who wanted to talk to our leaders about the war. president nixon tried to kick us off the mall. but we knocked on door after door of capitol hill and too often couldn't get an audience. a precious few, including ted kennedy and hubert humphery came to where we were camped out. i saw firsthand that our political process works only when leaders are willing to listen. >> he left the floor to a standing ovation capping off nearly three decades of public service. and it set off a mad political scramble to his senate seat. today, massachusetts governor picked boston lawyer as an interim replacement. >> so who is mr. callan? and is scott brown gearing up for a comeback? >> joining me now is susan mil ler ligan and contributor to the last lion, the biography of the late senator ted kennedy. thank you both for coming on the sho
a budget that indicates what the priorities are for the democrats in the united states senate, and maybe we'll agree on a bipartisan basis to a budget. in any event, we ought not to ignore the law any longer, and i think it's a good step in the direction of getting back to regular order which we ought to follow. it strikes me most of the time, unless there's a pretty strong reason not to do that. >> it's been 1,371 days since the democrats last moved a budget through the united states senate, and thanks to the pressure that was brought by house republicans in passing their no budget, no pay provision as part of the debt ceiling bill that's now come over to the senate, it looks like the senate according to senator murray will now take up a budget. this is important because while republicans believe that spending is the problem not a lack of taxation, it's going to be a revealing exercise to see how this budget markup goes in committee and then, of course, on the floor. and it will be, i'm sure, a challenge for those who believe that more revenue is a solution as opposed to reining in spendin
of pace in the u.s. senate. throughout its history, the united states senate has been the world's greatest deliberative body and sometimes they deliberate a little bit too long but the white house actually said that they supported the modest measures and it depends on where you are on the united states senate. sometimes when people want quick action now, those people were disappointed but if you believe in evolutional or gradual change as president obama sometimes does, you would end up taking that half or a third of a loaf. >> okay. so progressives, though, certainly have not had a good time hearing about this and specifically coming out and being very stern in reaction to harry reid. take a listen to rachel maddow. >> wow, harry reid, yeah. this is the day everybody was looking forward to in terms of changing how the senate operate and if you hear sad trombones, that's why. after the months, years of promises this time he was going to do it. but hey. at least we'll be able to see them get nothing done faster now. >> all right. so i had a chance to talk with ed schultz in hi hour disappoi
overwhelming support from the united states senate. >> reporter: earlier kerry was greeted by cheers. it is a committee he led the past four years. >> first of all, you had a -- lightning-speed approval of the committee unanimously. >> reporter: kerry says he hopes the approval is part of the greater bipartisanship. >> there is so much on plate. we need to find a way to work together. i hope this is a symbol people are really prepared to do that. >> reporter: outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton recognized a deep divisions in congress have hurt progress. >> you can't let compromise become a dirt write word because then you veer towards fanaticism. >> reporter: she laid out the complicated map kerry would navigate. security challenges in north africa and the middle east. departmental changes in response to that deadly terrorist attack in benghazi, libya. >> every day a mixture of trying to end crises, help people be smart about using the tools of american diplomacy. >> reporter: kerry's colleagues say he is ready for the challenges. >> respect his work in the senate, his knowle
respect the prerogatives of the united states senate and the members of congress, you represent the american people, you're the other branch of government, you have the right to know what took place. and i have an obligation commensurate with the, you know, regulations and classifications and privacy and other things at play here, to help you get the answers and we'll do that. i hope we can do it in a noncontentious, appropriate way. >> thank you. could i just mention, i think you would aee with me that every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. so there is, it seems to me, a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months and 60,000 dead. >> but i think you would agree with me that whatever judgments you make, they have to pass the test of whether or not, you do them, they're actually going to make things better. >> absolutely. >> you have to make a test of the cost analysis in doing that. and i mean all kinds of cos. human life costs, treasure, effect on other countrie
on the program. >> thank you, luke. >> i want to ask you, we were very much supportive here in the united states two years ago, on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution in tahrir square, as well as what we saw in tunisia, as well as what we saw in libya. were we naive to be thankful that these despottic leaders were pushed out of power? >> well, luke, what you're pointing to is the inherent tension between our desire for stability, for security, for economic progress and our fundamental commitment to democracy. i recently visited egypt for several days last week on a congressional delegation trip with republicans and democrats. we had a chance to meet with the leadership of egypt, both the defense minister, prime minister, the current president, and a lot of the opposition. and i left deeply concerned about the path forward for egypt, reminded of its importance, it is the most populous arab country. it is, in many ways, the linchpin of the region. and we want them to continue to respect their treaty commitments under the camp david accords for peace with israel, for being one of th
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)